2020 Dodge Challenger 392 Scat Pack

2020 Dodge Challenger 392 Scat Pack

To say that I fell in love with this Challenger Scat Pack would be an understatement.

This 2020 Dodge Challenger 392 Scat Pack truly is a unique car in today’s market, because the majority of people seem to talk about crossovers or electrified cars when considering their next vehicle purchase. As the last true American muscle car in today’s market, the Challenger is something special for those that are smitten with the sound and feel of a raucous large-displacement naturally aspirated engine and a throwback into what defined a generation many years ago.

To say that I fell in love with this Challenger Scat Pack would be an understatement. This large brute of a car is not perfect but for what it is, it does exceptionally well in my opinion. Throw in some nostalgia growing up as a kid in the 1970s and 1980s and it becomes much easier to see why a car like this brings back some great memories.

There are no ifs, ands or buts regarding the Dodge Challenger’s size. At 16.5 feet in length it is almost the same size as the Durango (reviewed here), just without all the passenger space.  Front passengers have nothing to worry about as my vertically blessed height fit without issue, and for a two-door, the rear seats are surprisingly huge. Cargo space in the trunk is a massive 458-liters, and the Widebody package enhances the look and size immensely. Dodge doesn’t try to hide anything about the size of the Challenger.

The Challenger Scat Pack looks aggressive with its wide stance and massive 305/35ZR20 tires mounted on 20-inch inch wheels, which are stunning. The headlight setup and bulging vented hood are aggressive enough that most cars will move aside as the Challenger approaches from behind. With the Green Metallic paint optioned here,  the car received its fair share of admirers during my time behind the wheel, and the muscular exhaust note only adds to the appeal.

Inside the Challenger, it’s all business. If you love the color black, you are going to feel right at home. With the exception of a few dashes of silver and carbon fiber, there is not much to get excited about. The interior has improved in quality over the years but Audi has nothing to worry about. There are soft touch materials where need be, however harder plastics rule in this Dodge. Luckily, our Challenger was optioned with a suede headliner and Nappa leather and Alcantara seats which were super comfortable. If you want to take this car for a cross country jaunt, the seats will serve you well.

Unlike muscle cars of yore, you can connect your cell phone to the standard Android Auto or Apple CarPlay displayed on an easy to use 8.4-inch infotainment screen. Here drivers are able to select the various driving modes such Street, Sport and Track. Mopar even allows customization of the steering, traction and suspension for a tailored experience to your driving style and commute. The optioned 18-speaker Harman/Kardon system with surround sound is also something not found in the classic muscle car and a welcomed treat.

Under the hood lies a potent 6.4-liter SRT HEMI V8 that puts out 485 horsepower at 6,100RPM and 475 lb-ft. of torque at 4,100RPM. A sprint to 100km/h takes just 4.2 seconds. While cruising on the highway in sixth gear, the engine purrs at leisurely 1,700RPM. Power is available everywhere in the rev range. Add the six-speed manual gearbox optioned here to increase the smiles per minute.

This gearbox may lack the refinement of a Honda or Mazda stick shift, however it feels perfect in the Challenger. The clutch is easy to modulate and the shifter needs to be manhandled; just what you need in a modern muscle car. The shifter is angled towards the driver and the thick leather wheel feels fantastic. A competition suspension along with the lighter weight and potent engine make the Scat Pack 392 the handling darling of the Challenger lineup. With all of this and the capable chassis underneath, the Scat Pack can pull 0.98g on the skidpad.

At 4,308 pounds, this is far from a light car and makes it well known when it’s time to fill up with premium grade fuel. Dodge rates it at 16.7L/100km in the city and 10.4L/100km on the highway. Over a mostly city commute, we observed 17.0L/100km overall. It should be noted that this vehicle was left in “Sport” for nearly the entire test week. And yes, drivers will be tempted to tap the throttle more and more; this is one of those times when fuel economy just really doesn’t matter.

The Challenger SRT tested here starts at $52,295, while loaded with several options that total $19,085 ballooning the as-tested price to $71,380; not exactly chump change. Choose your options carefully and you can knock a few thousand off without trying. However, savvy buyers would also take note that a Challenger Hellcat (reviewed here) starts at $71,745. Also worth noting is that the R/T with the 5.7-liter V8 starts at just $35,290; there really is a Challenger for everyone.

Those that wanted a muscle car a decade ago could choose from the Ford Mustang, Chevy Camaro and Dodge Challenger. Over the last several years, both of the other entries have shifted to become truly great sport cars in their own right, while Dodge has stayed true to the Challenger’s heritage and stands as the last real muscle car. To this day, the Challenger remains a strong seller even with the shift away from cars. If given the opportunity, I would gladly have a 2020 Dodge Challenger 392 Scat Pack sitting in my own garage.

See Also:

2020 Ford Mustang GT Coupe

2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye

2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk

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