2013 Honda Fit Sport

2013 Honda Fit Sport

The subcompact car market in Canada is very crowded with many of the big brands offering their own take on the small, efficient, and practical set of wheels. The common denominators are four-cylinder engines, hatchback body designs, four doors, and most importantly, low prices. I had a whole mess of computer networking hardware to transport, so when Honda gave me the chance to sample the 2013 Honda Fit Sport, I took the opportunity to see what their engineers could squeeze into their lineup’s smallest footprint.

The subcompact car market in Canada is very crowded with many of the big brands offering their own take on the small, efficient, and practical set of wheels. The common denominators are four-cylinder engines, hatchback body designs, four doors, and most importantly, low prices. I had a whole mess of computer networking hardware to transport, so when Honda gave me the chance to sample the 2013 Honda Fit Sport, I took the opportunity to see what their engineers could squeeze into their lineup’s smallest footprint.

 

2013 Honda Fit Sport side profile

 

The Fit Sport ticks all the right boxes. It features a 1.5L four-cylinder motor producing 117hp, which is right in the middle of the class. It is paired up with a five-speed manual transmission that makes the most of the power available. A five-speed automatic transmission is an option, but really, why would you want to go down that road? The hatchback body boasts a lot of room for stuff, and it starts at about $15,000 brand new for a base model. The Sport trim adds 16” alloy wheels, an additional anti-roll bar in the back, aero trim touches, a better stereo (with USB auxiliary input as well as Bluetooth), fog lights, as well as some other small creature comforts.

 

Full disclosure: I own an old-school Honda Civic Wagon. This new Fit, even twenty-two years later, is dimensionally very similar to Honda’s compact wagon of the past, aside from the added height in the new car. The simplicity of everything, powertrain, practicality, and proportions all make this car essentially a modernized Honda Civic Wagon. In its segment, it goes head-to-head with cars like the Ford Fiesta, Chevy Sonic, Hyundai Accent, Mazda 2, and Toyota Yaris.

 

2013 Honda Fit Sport shifter

 

There is a lot to like in the Fit, but there are a few items that stood out in the week I had the car. Honda has always spent a lot of time and engineering getting the driving position correct in all their cars. The seat is very configurable, so drivers of all sizes will be able to get a handle on the steering, pedals, and shifter in relative ergonomic comfort. Thanks to low sills, wrap-around glass out back, and relatively thin pillars, visibility is very good in all directions. The clutch is typical Honda-goodness: easy to modulate and a joy to use. The shifter throws are slightly long, but engages very positively. This really matters as you are rowing through the gears a lot – the gearing is short. 100km/h spins the motor at 3000rpm.

 

 

Many new cars are being designed with electric power steering assist – Honda is no exception. They tend to get a bad rap due to how lifeless they feel in your hands. High assist and zero feedback through to your fingers dulls the experience of what driving a nimble and lightweight car should be. Honda needs to be commended here – they have done a great job. They have managed to design an overall steering system that feels better than some traditional hydraulic steering systems. I’m looking at you, Toyota.

 

2013 Honda Fit Sport emblem

 

Fuel efficiency is high on the list for many sub-compact car shoppers. Honda rates the Fit Sport at 7.1L/100km in the city, 5.7L/100km on the highway, and 6.5L/100km combined. During my week with the Fit, I spent a lot of time in the city, yet the average fuel economy stayed below 7.1L/100km at all times. This is impressive considering the constant stop-and-go traffic we are used to seeing in Toronto. As good as the average readout was all week, I was puzzled to see how quickly the fuel gauge fell. At half tank, I was barely over 200km on the trip meter. And then, close to empty, the meter read at just over 400km. This suggests a not-so-great overall range per tank. Doing some investigation, I found that the fuel tank is only rated to hold 40L of regular 87 octane gasoline. This is very small by modern standards. I then found that the fuel tank is mounted under the driver and front passenger, in an effort to improve cargo-carrying capacity in the rear of the car. This makes sense from a packaging perspective, but seriously hampers the overall range of the Fit between fill-ups. You’ll be stopping at gas stations often, but it won’t cost you very much each time.

 

 

I like the Honda Fit a lot. It is an ideal city car: efficient, easy to maneuver, can hold lots of stuff, fun to drive, built well, and most importantly, is easy on your wallet. I came away this week feeling that this is a smartly-designed car for the price, rather than a car that has been designed down to meet a cut-throat price point. As long as you are okay with stopping more often for inexpensive gas fill-ups, the Honda Fit is worth a good hard look in what is an extremely competitive segment.

 

 

2013 Honda Fit Sport Gallery

 

 

See Also:

2013 Toyota Yaris LE

2013 Hyundai Accent Hatchback

2013 Mazda2 GS

 

 

 

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Louis Vo
Louis Vo
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